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AAD-PEPR Atopic Dermatitis Project

Atopic dermatitis (AD, eczema) is a chronic, inflammatory, itchy skin condition that usually develops in infancy or early childhood. There has been a steep rise in the prevalence of eczema, with up to 20% of children in developed countries now suffering from the disease. In the United States, AD affects about 17% of children with 37% of affected school-aged children having moderate to severe disease and greater severity in lower socioeconomic and minority populations.

 

Although AD is a common condition, there remains uncertainty among health professionals, patients, and caregivers regarding optimal treatment. The psychological, financial, and social burdens of AD are substantial. Childhood AD not only produces physical symptoms such as pruritus, skin discomfort and sleep disruption, but also causes emotional distress, frustration, behavior problems, isolation, embarrassment, social stigma, low self-esteem and poor body image.

 

The difficulties associated with itching and scratching are typically the first to be mentioned by parents when asked about the effects of their child’s disease. The mechanisms underlying AD-associated itch remain unclear, as it is an area of active research. Itch is also considered a crucial contributor to sleep disruption in children with AD, yet available sleep questionnaires do not adequately address the central role of itch in sleep issues. Therefore, we seek to make current questionnaires more comprehensive by adding items that will focus on addressing sleep impairment to have a more accurate assessment of children’s quality of life.

BACKGROUND

  • Improve the assessment of outcomes in clinical trials or other research settings

  • Personalize ongoing care of children with AD and other conditions associated with itch

  • Develop tools that will allow for future studies to investigate the impact of environmental stressors on children’s health including their symptoms, functioning and general QOL

STUDY AIMS

  • Improve the assessment of outcomes in clinical trials or other research settings

  • Personalize ongoing care of children with AD and other conditions associated with itch

  • Develop tools that will allow for future studies to investigate the impact of environmental stressors on children’s health including their symptoms, functioning and general QOL

GOALS